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Delilah – 2 year old German Shepherd Mix

Delilah is a 2 year old German Shepherd mix who came to Nebraska dog trainers because she was pulling on her leash, jumping on people, and not listening to basic commands. Her owner loves her and wanted to be able to take her places and have her be more a part of the family. After her board and train, she is able to go on walks now without pulling her owner’s arm off, and she can go to work and other places now with her owner. Her owner is thrilled with her transformation!  Check out her video!

https://youtu.be/7MtNYL9evIw

10 Warning Signs To Ensure You Are Not Getting A Dog From A Puppy Mill!

Nowadays it has become more important than ever to adopt a pet instead of buying it. Thousands of helpless animals are put to death every year because they are ownerless. If you have your heart set on a puppy of your own there is no reason not to call around shelters and find some puppies that way… however; if you absolutely must buy your new pup from an unfamiliar source you can still do your part to help out. Here’s how.

Puppy Farms are more commonplace than you would think. Puppy Farms exist the whole world over. Why are they so bad? Puppy Farms (also called Puppy Mills) keep numerous dogs in cramped conditions with poor sanitation and little food. The dogs are often kept in tiny cages, are fed whatever the owners can spare and are bred relentlessly with the sole aim of making their owners a profit.

To help you spot potential Puppy Farmers we put together a helpful list of points to look out for. If you suspect you have found a rogue breeder then you ought to report them to the relevant authorities.

Some ways to tell if your puppy was raised at a puppy mill:

1. The most obvious sign of a Puppy Farmer is that they will not be able to produce either of the pups parents. No parents means the dog has already been separated – usually too early. If your breeder won’t let you meet your pups mom and dad (at least the mom) then read on and see if they meet any other criteria.

2. The second thing to ask is if the parents were vaccinated. If the mom is up-to-date on shots. If not, there may be a distinct possibility that this breeder doesn’t care much for their animals. They should know this information, and if they don’t know both parents bear in mind that they therefore cannot be entirely sure of the lineage.

3. You will be able to tell a lot about where the breeder meets you. Purchasing from a reputable dealer you will often find you are invited to their home. If the address is a warehouse in an industrial estate don’t bother going. A dodgy breeder might also want to bring the puppy to you or meet at a neutral spot, so be wary of that, as well.

4. Once you meet your breeder, ask them specifically how many breeds they own. If it is more than two (or three at a maximum) then the chances are that they are a Puppy Farmer. Puppy Mills often carry as many breeds as possible, reputable breeders tend to keep their dogs at home and in comfort, and more than three breeds is hard work for a household.

5. Ask how many pups are for sale. A normal litter is between five and eight puppies (with exceptions), if there are eighteen (etc) puppies for sale then you know that the breeder has multiple pregnant dogs from different breeds, a clear indicator of a Puppy Farmer.

6. Ask what age the puppy is. Puppies shouldn’t be taken away from their mothers until “at least six weeks,” but eight weeks is recommended (and in some cases, state law). If the puppy is younger than that and the parent is nowhere in sight then alarm bells should be ringing.

7. Hygiene can be another clue. A new puppy smells much like a new baby. A puppy from a Farm will smell like a kennel. They will often be dirty in appearance and their coat is unlikely to be shiny.

8. Paperwork is important. If you are buying a breeder’s dog they will provide you with paperwork assuring you the dog is a registered pedigree. If you are not buying a pedigree of course you cannot get this certificate – however – a good breeder should care where their pups go. Your breeder should draw up some kind of paperwork that states what happens if the dog needs to be returned etc. They will often also want to call you to check in. A good breeder wants to know their dog has gone to a good home. So, look for a contract and the breeder questioning YOU (fenced in yard, do you have a home or an apartment, etc). A Puppy Farmer is a lot less likely to care. If their only concern is that you have the money and no other questions, contracts, or applications, it is more than likely a puppy mill or backyard breeder. Also, they should care with pairing you with the RIGHT dog.

9. If you are buying from a pet shop make sure to inquire about the dogs parentage. A good shop will keep records, a bad shop might be dealing in out-of-State Puppy Farmers. Always ask. In general, you should shy away getting dogs from Pet Shops, as many of them are obtained from puppy mills.

10. Deception – if you think you are being deceived then don’t buy. Do a little research. For example; if you want a small dog learn which breed of small dog specifically you would like. If you then go to a breeder armed with this information you are less likely to be fooled. Puppy Farmers are notorious for telling you what you want to hear and will make all sorts of wild assurances to make the sale. It is hard to tell when you are being lied to, but much easier if you know exactly what to look for in your prospective pup!

There are other things you can look for. If the dog seems unhealthy in any way then a good breeder will know what is wrong with them and be able to tell you how to go about fixing it. A good breeder will also have a reliable phone number, and possible multiple ways to be contacted – not true of a Puppy Farmer, who will often change numbers to avoid angry retaliation from clients. Small clues you might look out for in the dogs behavior include being afraid of humans, a generally nervous disposition and anything else that indicates that the animal has been kept in dark or cramped conditions. Puppy Farm pups are often kept in wire cages and you might see signs of this on their paws.

In general, be wary of bad breeders and report anything suspicious until no dog has to endure such a terrible life.

The website, Bailing out Benji has a solid list of known puppy mills broken down by state: https://bailingoutbenji.com/puppy-mill-maps/. Generally, you will be able to see a correlation between heavy Amish communities and known puppy mills in the area. For example, the 3 largest Amish counties in the United States, are also the 3 largest counties in those states with known puppy-mills. So, not all Amish run puppy mills; however, this is why it’s important to do your research!

So, if you are going to get a puppy from the Amish, Pet Stores, or unknown breeders: do your research! Ask for references, ask to meet the parents, meet at the place the dogs actually live, see the living conditions of the dogs, and their appearance of health!

If not, you could be stuck with a dog filled with a life of behavior or health issues.

Linden – 1 yr old Labradoodle

Linden came to us a pretty good girl, but she needed polishing. Her owner wants to use her as a therapy dog, so she needed to be able to be greeted by strangers and sit nicely for petting. She also pulled on her leash and was easily distracted. After her boarding training, her owners are pleased with the results. She now walks nicely at your side, greets strangers more calmly, and she can be out in public without being a wild woman. Check out her amazing video!

https://youtu.be/mH5KNgRgYhw

Charming – Corgi Mix

Charming came to Nebraska Dog Trainers because he pulled on his leash, jumped on people and was little dog aggressive. This happy little guy loved his training and excelled at it. his Owners love that he is a well mannered dog that they can take with them on family activities.  Check out his before and after video.

https://youtu.be/9VsvUgoKq6Y

About our Fort Myers Dog Trainers

Brandi – 6mo old Australian Shepherd

Brandi, a 6-month-old Australian Shepherd, came to Nebraska Dog Trainers because she was nipping, counter-surfing, barking and pulling on the leash, barking for attention, chasing the family cat, and jumping on people. Her family knew she was already a good dog, but they wanted an awesome, well-mannered part of the family that they can take to all their activities. They are so excited with her results!  Check out her video.

https://youtu.be/uXJJ74KATlc

Apollo – 1 year old Husky

Apollo is a 1 year old Husky Mix who came to us because he didn’t know how to control his jumping, he pulled on the leash and just didn’t have a lot of manners. He is such a loving boy who did great during the training and loved every minute of it! He no longer jumps on people, he walks wonderfully on a leash and has great manners! His owners are so excited to have him back and to continue to work with their loving dog! Great job Apollo! Check out his video below.

 

Sadie – 1 yr old Golden Retriever

Sadie is a sweet one year old Golden Retriever who didn’t always know how to control her excitement and love for attention so she would constantly jump on people, had no impulse control and loved rushing the door. She aims to please so did wonderful during her board and train and loved improving her self control! We are all so proud of her, especially her mom! Great job Sadie!  Check our her video.

https://youtu.be/fPQHkfm4qkw

Littermate Syndrome in Dogs | Problems with Littermates

Littermate Syndrome in Dogs | Off Leash K9 Training | Problems with Littermates

Dogs, Puppies, Play, Two, Group, In The Free, Nature

Bringing a new puppy home is an amazing experience that will change your life, but some breeders may try and encourage you to take a littermate also. Some people would be able to handle such a commitment of two puppies, but littermates can come with a whole set of challenges you may not be expecting. In this article we will talk about what littermate syndrome is and how it can cause multiple behavioral issues littermates can develop.

What is littermate syndrome?
Littermate syndrome is when two puppies from the same litter are raised in the same home and develop a bond with each other. This early bond to one another can cause dog on dog aggression in the future and prevent the puppies from bonding to you. Additionally, these two puppies can become so bonded that when they are separated from each other they can develop severe separation anxiety. Sometimes when puppies of the same age are adopted and raised at the same time, but are from different litters, can still develop littermate syndrome. Other behavioral issues that can develop are:

  • The failure to learn simple commands because the focus on each other.
  • Fearful to unfamiliar stimuli
  • Fighting amongst littermates later in life

What if you already adopted a pair of littermates?
Now not every pair of puppy siblings will develop littermate syndrome, but there are things that you can do to prevent it from happening that won’t harm your puppies’ development. The goal is to keep the puppies from developing emotional dependence with one another. Here are some steps you can take:

  • Crating is a great habit to develop at a young age to get your puppies comfortable with them and it also provides them with a safe place that is their own within the house. Each puppy should have their own crate that they sleep in at night. For the first night, you can set the crates side by side, so each pup can start to adjust to being alone. Increase the distance between each crate incrementally until the crates are far enough apart that the puppies cannot see one another.
  • Separate the training and playing sessions and work with each puppy individually so they can focus on giving you their undivided attention. This allows you to also become the leader to each puppy because you are the one giving the commands and the one in control of the treats. To keep you other puppy occupied have another member of the family work or play with that puppy in another room or in the backyard. If this wont work, you can use a treat-release toy with the other puppy while they are in their crate. 
  • Lastly, if you notice a major increase in issues, I recommend that you give one of the puppies to a friend or family member.  Sometimes, this is the best solution for everyone involved.

Littermate syndrome is not going to happen to every single pair of puppies that are raised together. Sometimes genetics play a role but the most important thing you can do is to make a commitment to your puppies and raise them to be well-socialized balanced adult dogs. If this might be too much for you to handle, just adopt one puppy, train it and raise it, until it is an adult and then add another puppy into your household. 

Junior – 1 1/2 year old Great Dane

Junior is a big boy, so he pretty much went where he wanted, when he wanted, on or off leash. He also had selective hearing when it came to commands, and he was very leery of strangers and would bark. After his two week board and train, he walks nicely on and off leash, he’s learned to calm himself and not run over the two young girls in the household, and he’s much more comfortable around strangers.

 

Natural Remedies for Dog Diarrhea

Let’s face it: as a pet parent you are going to have to deal with more than a few messes in your time. When it comes to diarrhea nobody wants it smeared over their carpet or even in their kennel. It’s one mess that we would all rather live without! Fortunately for those of us who’s pets hate the V-E-T there are a few natural remedies for doggy diarrhea available that can help soothe the distress.

Finding out the cause:

The first step in any diarrhea cure is to find out what is causing it and avoid that thing at all costs. If you can prevent the problem happening then you won’t need a natural remedy at all! Obviously if your dog has a severe bout of diarrhea at any time in its life you should visit the vet. It will make them lose vital enzymes, salts and waters from their body that can leave them severely dehydrated if you don’t act.

Steps:

1. Remove all food for 12 hours.

2. Make sure the dog has access to plenty of clean water. If needed, add chicken/beef broth or Pedialyte in addition to the water to help motivate them to drink.

3. Offer the dog a small portion of boiled white meat chicken (no bones or skin) and white rice. This can be the dog’s food until their stool consistency returns to normal.

4. If the diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours or your dog’s condition worsens at any time, call your vet immediately.

Natural Yogurt:

Giving your dog a little dose of the natural probiotics found in plain yogurt will help to replace some of the vital stomach bacteria they have lost. Probiotics should be used in harmony for best results.

Boiled Eggs:

Eggs can give your dog a natural protein boost that makes sure they are getting the nutrients they need in spite of the diarrhea. Be warned that this one is a hit or a miss. Sometimes an egg will just run straight through them. 

Pumpkin:

Plain canned pumpkin is a great choice to sometimes help with diarrhea! It contains fiber, prebiotics, and vitamins/minerals! You can 1-to-4 tablespoons of pumpkin to your dog’s food. Start out with smaller quantities to avoid adding too much fiber to your dog’s diet, if you are unsure, consult your veterinarian. 

Reminder:

Remember that if the symptoms persist you need to go to the vet. Also, if your dog has a pre-existing medical condition that causes the diarrhea then consult your vet about the best dietary changes to make. This problem is sometimes caused by a food allergy, so the solution should usually focus on diet first… it just never hurts to get a check up and make sure there is nothing else going wrong.